Introducing Pilot Digimap trial

If you need to access building heights or ages, or want to compare plant density in the city versus rural areas then we can help! Introducing Digimap’s new Pilot Collection, available on trial to staff and students until the 31st July 2020:


Building use, heights and area (Mapping is fully classified for urban areas (with a population above 10,000)

This screenshot shows Pilot Roam with a campus building clicked on. An information panel shows the Property Area, Building Area, and Height amongst other information. The buildings are coloured in different colours, and a key to the left shows a range of different building uses.

The map above shows our campus buildings in ‘Educational” pale yellow, and the surrounding residential flats in lavender. Select the information button and click on any building to show height and area details.

Building age (Mapping is fully classified for urban areas (with a population above 10,000)

This screenshot shows the University campus with each building coloured according to it's age. Labels have been added to highlight the library, Fraser Building, and Gilbert Scott Building. There is a key to the left showing what time period the colours represent.

The map above shows the University campus coloured by age, with the Gilbert Scott building categorised as Historic (opened 1870), the library as Mixed Age Part Postwar (opened 1968) and the Fraser Building as Modern (redeveloped in 2009, and originally opened 1966).

Land use

The screenshot shows a map with an overlay of coloured sections. The key on the left shows what each colour represents. The information window has been clicked on a part of the map and shows that this coloured section is "Recreational land"

The land use mapping breaks down the land into 30 different types, including agricultural, recreational, residential, and parks. Each coloured section can be clicked on to find the specific land use type. In the map above the feature information shows the Botanic Gardens.

London only data

There are a number of collections available for the city of London, including overhead cable areas, aerial imagery, and tree canopies.

The map shows the area around the Houses of Parliament, with all buildings in pale grey, and round green circles of varying diameter that represent tree canopies.

Tree canopy details at the Houses of Parliament around Westminster showing the individual trees and their size.


Satellite data, including infrared

The screenshot shows a map of the west end of Glasgow, with buildings in green, and plant life in varying shades of pink.

The infrared overlay shows the plant cover in pink over Glasgow’s west end, with darker shades of pink indicating higher plant density. Kelvingrove Park can be seen just below the darkest area (Great Western Road and Woodlands Road)


Feedback

Digimap are looking for feedback, so feel free to use the star rating system within Digimap, or send us an email to let us know if you found the datasets useful for your research.

Note: you need to accept the end user licence agreement to use Pilot. You will be taken automatically to this page on selecting Pilot.


Digimap help

If you need any help using Digimap Pilot either email us or watch Digimap’s Pilot webinar tutorial. We’re available Monday to Friday 9 am to 5 pm. Let us know if you find the Pilot collection useful to your research.



Categories: Library, Official Publications

Tags: , , , ,

1 reply

  1. This is a timely addition to the services offered by this library, and I can see that many persons will benefit.Great job!
    Regards, lornafraserja.com

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