Scottish Health, Nuclear Weapons, and Sexual Identity – New Official Publications 10.10.17

Newly published official publications from :

The Scottish Parliament and Government

Image © Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body – 2012. Licensed under the Open Scottish Parliament Licence v1.0.

Image © Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body – 2012. Licensed under the Open Scottish Parliament Licence v1.0.

Scottish Health Survey 2016: Main Report – “The Scottish Health Survey 2016 report presents statistics on mental health, general health and caring, alcohol consumption, smoking, diet, physical activity, obesity, respiratory conditions, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

Key findings are presented alongside trends, some of which extend back two decades.”

Scottish Health Survey 2016: Technical Report – “The reports presents information on the methodology and fieldwork for the Scottish Health Survey 2016. It includes details of sampling, weighting, response rates, the survey questionnaire and other fieldwork documents.”

Talking ‘Fracking’: A Consultation on Unconventional Oil and Gas – Analysis of Responses – “The Scottish Government remains committed to a careful, considered and evidence-led approach to unconventional oil and gas. In January 2015, the Scottish Government put in place a moratorium on granting consents for unconventional oil and gas developments in Scotland, and committed to undertaking further research on potential impacts before holding a full public consultation.

The consultation, Talking “Fracking”, ran from 31 January to 31 May 2017, and received more than 60,000 responses. The consultation analysis has been undertaken by Griesbach & Associates, a Scotland-based consortium of independent social policy research analysts.”

Westminster and the UK Government

House of Commons Library (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

House of Commons Library (c) Parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

Nuclear Weapons – Country Comparisons – “There are nine countries in the world that have nuclear weapons. Between them they possess an estimated 15,000 nuclear warheads. This paper is intended as a brief guide to which countries possess nuclear weapons and how they are seeking to either modernise or expand those capabilities.

Globalisation, Technology and Demographic Change and the Future of Work – “This House of Lords Library briefing provides an overview of globalisation, technology and demography and some of the ways in which they affect work and employment in the UK. It then summarises some relevant public policy proposals and suggests material for further reading.

On 12 October 2017, the House of Lords is due to debate a motion, moved by Lord Knight of Weymouth (Labour), that “this House takes note of the effect of globalisation, technology and demographic change on the future of work, and of the public policy response to those changes”. This short briefing provides an overview of globalisation, technology and demography and some of the ways in which they affect work and employment in the UK. It then summarises some relevant public policy proposals and suggests material for further reading.”

Public sector pay – “This briefing provides an overview of public sector pay policy; the financial implications of the cap and the cost of removing it; trends in public sector pay; and recent debate on the subject.

The European Union

European Parliament © European Union 2016

European Parliament © European Union 2016

The end of roaming charges within the EU – “The European Union has worked for 10 years to eliminate extra roaming charges within the Union and on June 15, 2017 the EU achieved this objective. This Flash survey measures awareness about the abolition of roaming charges, and the impact this has had on citizens’ mobile use when travelling in the EU.”

Judicial remedies for individuals before the highest jurisdictions, a comparative law perspective – The United Kingdom – “The study presented below forms part of a larger project whose aim is to provide a comparative analysis of the rights of individuals in law proceedings before the highest courts of different States and before certain international courts. The objective is to describe the various remedies developed under domestic law that are available through the UK courts including the Supreme Court which, though not a constitutional court in the classic Kelsenian model, does sits at the apex of the appellate court structure in the UK. The study commences with an historical introduction which stresses the absence in domestic law of a clearly delineated sense of what counts as ‘constitutional’ .In traditional accounts of the UK Constitution there is no hierarchy of higher order ‘constitutional’ and ‘ordinary’ Acts of Parliament. Neither has a separate court structure developed to handle exclusively constitutional claims, although specialised ad hoc tribunals do exist in public law contexts. The underpinning principles remain (i) the doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty and (ii) the rule of law…”

Office for National Statistics

Sexual identity, UK: 2016 – “Experimental Official Statistics on sexual identity in the UK in 2016 by region, sex, age, marital status, ethnicity and National Statistics Socio-economic Classification.

Main points

  • In 2016, just over 1 million (2.0%) of the UK population aged 16 and over identified themselves as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB).
  • The population aged 16 to 24 were the age group most likely to identify as LGB in 2016 (4.1%).
  • More males (2.3%) than females (1.6%) identified themselves as LGB in 2016.
  • The population who identified as LGB in 2016 were most likely to be single, never married or civil partnered, at 70.7%.”

National life tables, UK: 2014 to 2016 – “Trends for the UK and constituent countries in the average number of years people will live beyond their current age measured by “period life expectancy”, analysed by age and sex.

Main points

  • A newborn baby boy could expect to live 79.2 years and a newborn baby girl 82.9 years if mortality rates remain the same as they were in the UK in 2014 to 2016 throughout their lives.
  • Improvements in life expectancy at birth for males in the UK have slowed from 13.6 weeks per year between 1980 to 1982 and 2009 to 2011, to 6.0 weeks per year between 2010 to 2012 and 2014 to 2016; for females improvements have slowed from 10.0 weeks to 3.6 weeks per year for the same periods.
  • In 2014 to 2016, a man in the UK aged 65 had an average further 18.5 years of life remaining and a woman 20.9 years.
  • A male born in 2014 to 2016 had a 21% chance, and a female a 32% chance, of surviving to at least age 90.”

 

If you’d like to know more about official publications just get in touch with us at the Maps, Official Publications and Statistics Unit on Level 7 of the library. We’re open Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm, and can be contacted on 0141 330 6740 or mops@lib.gla.ac.uk.



Categories: Library, Official Publications

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1 reply

  1. Reblogged this on SWOP Forum.

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