Excavating Waterloo tourist photographs

Following the success of Dr Anita Quye’s appeal to crowdsource #perkinpatterns for her Dye-Versity project we are now asking you to have a dig in your collections and share any Waterloo battlefield photographs with the University of Glasgow’s Professor Tony Pollard and the team at Waterloo Uncovered. Waterloo Uncovered is a registered charity that combines world-class archaeology with forces veteran care and recovery. Professor Pollard is the charity’s archaeological director as well as Director of the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Battlefield Archaeology.

From 10 to 21 July this year a team will head to Belgium for the third year in a row to uncover evidence that has been in the earth for over 200 years.  Alongside the original battle relics, the team will uncover many more modern artefacts that are potentially interesting in themselves as sources for the study of battlefield tourism.

The significance of a set of battlefield tourist photographs was realised recently by Tony and his PhD student Euan Loarridge. The photos were taken by William Fulton Jackson on a European trip in 1903. They have now been digitised and a new Flickr set created to share them with the Waterloo Uncovered team as they excavate the Hougoumont site. Knowing where tourists were encouraged to visit and how they travelled there will provide useful context as they identify the finds.

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That is where you come in. Does anyone else have tourist photos that could shed new light on the way the Waterloo battlefields have been managed and accessed in previous generations? The team would love to see anything right up through the 1950s and 1960s.

You can get in touch on twitter at @UofGlasgowASC  @ProfTonyPollard and @DigWaterloo or through uofglasgowasc on Instagram. Please join in using the hashtag #WaterlooUncovered

If you are not on social media, please get in touch with us through our email address: library-asc@glasgow.ac.uk.



Categories: Archives and Special Collections

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