Graduation 2017/1917: Honours in the Humanities

Today sees another day of #UofGclassof2017’s hard work coming to fruition with those from the Schools of Humanities and Culture and Creative Arts graduating at 11am today, followed by the school of Modern Languages and Cultures at 4pm.

Throughout the summer graduation season we have been examining the records of students who graduated from the University this time 100 years ago! The following examples offer a glimpse into the lives and achievements of three MA graduates from the year 1917.

Jessie Gellatly Jarvie

Jessie Gellatly Jarvie was born in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, on 4 September 1895. Her mother was Jessie Ann Jarvie and her Father John was a financial secretary.

When she was 18 she came to the University to study French and Latin. Her matriculation slip for her second year (pictured) shows that she went on to study Higher French, Roman History and English. During her third year she studied Logic, French and Latin followed by Honours in French and Latin in her final year.

Jessie-Gallatly-Jarvie-profile

Jessie Jarvie’s matriculation slip from 1914-1915 (R8/5/35/10)

The University Calendars reveal that Jessie won several prizes throughout her time at the University, including prizes for composition in both French and Latin and first-class certificates in Ordinary and Higher French.

SEN_10_56_French

University Calendar, showing Jessie’s prizes for ‘Texts’ and ‘Composition’ in French (SEN 10/ 56)

The University’s General Council Register, of which all graduates become a member, show that upon completion of her studies she went on to become a Teacher.

Elizabeth Cecilia Knox

Elizabeth-Cecilia-Knox-profile

Matriculation slip of Elizabeth C Knox (R8/5/34/10)

Elizabeth Cecilia Knox was born in Glasgow on 21 October 1892, daughter of Mary H. Knox and Adam Easton Knox, an Engineer.

She began studying at the University in 1912, aged 19, taking classes in Greek and Latin. Her matriculation record for the University session of 1913-1914 (pictured) shows that she studied English, Moral Philosophy and Geology.

In her final years at the University she also studied History (Ordinary, Higher and Honours), Political Economy, Higher English and Constitutional History (Ordinary and Honours) before graduating with an MA in 1917.

Following her studies Elizabeth worked as a teacher and by the age of 40 had become Headmistress of Oakburn School in Windermere.

Ethel May Woodmore

Ethel May Woodmore, who also gradated with an MA in 1917, was born in Portsmouth. Her matriculation record (pictured) for her first session at the university (1914-1915) shows that her father William James was an Admiralty Overseer.

During her three years at the University she studied a wide range of subjects including French, Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, Ordinary and Honours History, Constitutional History and Logic.

Ethel-May-Woodmore-profile

Matriculation slip of Ethel May Woodmore (R8/5/35/11)

 If you would like to find out more about the students featured here, or any other students who graduated in 1917, you can now find them on the University Story website, or please contact us for further information.

Join us throughout graduation season @UofGlasgowASC, where we will be sharing more information and biographies of the University’s graduates of 1917.

We would love to hear from you if you have any more information or photographs of any of our graduates from 1917 – get in contact with us at library-asc@glasgow.ac.uk – if you can help!

Congratulations to all those graduating today! Well done #UofGclassof2017 !

 

 



Categories: Archives and Special Collections

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