The Erskine Hospital Centenary Project

A Talk by Moira Rankin (Senior Archivist, University of Glasgow Library)
& Dr Jennifer Novotny (Research Assistant in History, University of Glasgow School of Humanities) in the Talk Lab on Level 3 of the University of Glasgow Library, 7 p.m. on Tuesday, 21st March, 2017

In 2014 the University of Glasgow Library and the charity Erskine formed a partnership to catalogue and preserve the records of Erskine Hospital, which opened in 1916 as the Princess Louise Hospital for Limbless Sailors and Soldiers. This partnership is the result of Professor Tony Pollard’s research into Glasgow pioneering surgeon Sir William Macewen’s connections with Erskine. The project was funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Moira Rankin will speak of the work undertaken by Archives & Special Collections to open up the collection for academic research while simultaneously supporting the charity in engaging audiences with their history. Dr Jennifer Novotny will discuss the research that has resulted from the Centenary Project. Her Wellcome Trust research scoping project entitled ‘They don’t want your charity – they demand their chance: The socio-economic rehabilitation of WW1 wounded at Erskine Hospital’ will be completed in 2017.

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img225.10.16

Postcard showing a group of nurses and patients outside Erskine House, c. 1917. Caption on the back reads: ‘Granddad Menzies at Erskine Hospital where Granny Menzies was staff nurse’, ‘with love to mother from Alex’ Catalogue: https://archiveshub.jisc.ac.uk/data/gb248-ugc225/ugc225/10/1/16

Erskine Hospital Records 0003

The first page of the first Admissions Register for the Princess Louise Scottish Hospital for Limbless Sailors and Soldiers at Erskine House. The first patients were admitted on 10 October 1916. Catalogue: https://archiveshub.jisc.ac.uk/data/gb248-ugc225/ugc225/3/1

The talk, which is hosted by the Friends of Glasgow University Library, is open to all. Visitors are welcome.

Posted on behalf of the Friends of GUL



Categories: Archives and Special Collections, Library

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