Glasgow World War One Commemoration: a blogpost by Demi Boyd

On the evening of November 11th 2014 Glasgow’s experience of World War One was commemorated with a light show projected on to Glasgow City Chambers. The display, which lasted 27 minutes and was played on a loop at intervals from 7pm until midnight, featured audio, film, and still images and was aptly titled ‘Glasgow’s War.’

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A couple of weeks ago I started a Club 21 internship with the University of Glasgow Archive Services. The project I have been working on involved creating an album in Flickr, ‘Glasgow’s War’ son et lumiere project.  This gave a taster of the images selected from collections held in the University that were to be used in the WWI Commemoration ‘Glasgow’s War.’ On Tuesday evening I went along to George Square to see the display.

The projection included stories from Glasgow’s home front and featured images from the Rent strikes, shipyards and munitions factories. The show touched upon Glaswegian women during the war and the vastly important work they carried out in the city. A first-hand account of a wounded soldier told of the horrors faced by the soldiers and a James Maxton narrative expressed the anti-war sentiment within Glasgow. The text revealed the startling figures of Glaswegians who perished during the war and those who were honoured with a Victoria Cross. These stories were woven together to effectively represent a very personal experience of Glasgow during the war.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The display ended with a piper playing while poppies descended down Glasgow City Chambers with the text ‘Their Name Liveth For Evermore.’ The display was watched in silence and the atmosphere was thoughtful in George Square. The end of the display was met with a round of applause and some even stayed on to watch the next showing. During the evening the name of every Glaswegian who died in the course of the war was projected on to the Cenotaph.

Click here for further information

 

 

 



Categories: Archive Services

Tags: , , ,

1 reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: