Clydebuilt: HMS Hood

HMS Hood was a battle cruiser built by John Brown & Company, Clydebank, for the Royal Navy and was launched on the 22nd of August 1918. At the time, HMS Hood was the largest and most powerful warship in the world with 151,000 shp and a top speed of 32 knots.

 

Although it was seen as a symbol of naval strength, HMS Hood was not upgraded to any significant extent during its lifetime and went into service during World War II with the same armour that was fitted in 1918. During the Battle of Denmark Strait on the 24th of May 1941 HMS Hood was sunk when gun fire from the Bismarck caused an explosion in the aft magazine of the ship; tragically only 3 of the 1,421 men on board survived.

 

HMS Hood on trial on the Firth of Clyde

HMS Hood on trial on the Firth of Clyde

At the University of Glasgow Archive Services we hold many of HMS Hood’s records in the Upper Clyde Shipbuilders (UCS) Clydebank Division collection. There are 18 plans of the ship, ranging from the rudder casting to colour plans of the profile and deck views of the ship in incredible detail. The collection also holds books with detailed breakdown of the building estimates and actual costs of the ship. Beyond the UCS collection we have photographs on glass negatives of HMS Hood as part of the Adamson Robertson collection.

 

Profile view of the HMS Hood

Profile view of the HMS Hood

 

The UCS and Adamson Robertson collections are both brilliant resources for anyone interested in the history of Clydebuilt ships and the people who made them.

 

For more information on what we hold on Clydebuilt ships, have a look at our source guides on our website.



Categories: Archive Services

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