Town Plan of Glasgow – Pollokshields Town Houses and Villas

The creation of the Pollokshields area of Glasgow was set in motion by the Stirling-Maxwell family of Pollok in 1849. The Stirling-Maxwells had been associated with the area as land-owners for centuries previous to this and would continue to be part of the fabric of the area for many years. The family would go on to be linked with the University of Glasgow when the Stirling-Maxwell Collection was bequeathed to the University in 1956.

When viewed from above in the following town plan sheets it becomes clear how much of the character of the area is owed to the initial urban planning of Edinburgh architect David Rhind. Over the years a who’s-who of architects of the era working in and around Glasgow (Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson and H.E. Clifford among them) were employed to design and build impressive town houses and villas for which the area became famous. Pollokshields has since become a designated conservation area due to its largely unspoiled Victorian and Edwardian dwellings.

Image of sheet VI.14.17 of Town Plan of Glasgow - Pollockshields area showing Aytoun and Nithsdale Road

Sheet VI.14.17 of the Town Plan of Glasgow: Pollokshields area showing Aytoun and Nithsdale Road. Click the image above to view a high resolution zoomable version.

Image of Town Plan of Glasgow Town Plan sheet VI.14.11 showing Albert and Maxwell Drive in Pollockshields

Sheet VI.14.11 showing Albert and Maxwell Drive in Pollokshields. Click the image above to view a high resolution zoomable version.

Pollokshields grew quickly over the years and in 1876 was granted Burgh status in recognition of this. By 1891 the outskirts of the city of Glasgow had reached Pollokshields and after some negotiation it became a suburb of the city. This section of the town plan was resurveyed soon afterwards in 1893 and these sheets were published in 1895.

Once again the level of detail available in the town plans is unrivalled in offering a snapshot of Glasgow at the end of the 19th century. In most cases the fascination in viewing these sheets lies in seeing what has changed, but in rare cases like this it lies in seeing what has remained the same.

The Zoomable versions of these maps can be viewed by clicking the images above or by clicking here and here. If you have any questions about these maps, or any other maps held by the University Library, feel free to contact the Maps, Official Publications and Statistics Unit.

Other entries in the series:

Gilbert Scott Building

Glasgow Botanic Gardens

Cattle Market, Gallowgate

Queen Street Station and George Square

Sighthill Cemetery

Duke Street Prison

Western Infirmary



Categories: Library, Official Publications

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